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Trade Agreements Switzerland

In this article, we examine how trade between China and Switzerland has developed in the short period of time that has happened since the CSFTA came into force. We will then look at the concessions made by the parties in the areas of tariffs, services and intellectual property and try to extrapolate what would involve similar concessions for the EU. Although Switzerland and the EU are different economies in size, they have negotiating interests similar to those of professional services, intellectual property protection and advanced machinery, as well as defensive interests such as agriculture. Free trade agreements aim to improve trade relations with key partners around the world. They aim to remove or, at the very least, minimize barriers to international markets for the Swiss economy. The aim is to reduce tariffs and non-tariff barriers (for example. B technical regulations, packaging and labelling requirements, import quotas). Types of accumulation: bilateral accumulation: only with primary subjects of the two free trade partners (bilateral) (for example. B Switzerland-Japan or AELE-COLOMBIA). Diagonal accumulation: possible with primary subjects of several free trade partners, as all apply the same country of origin rules (e.g.B.

EU-EFTA-Turkey). Cumulative euro-med: this is also possible with primary materials from Mediterranean countries, since all the free trade partners concerned apply the same country of origin rules and there are agreements between them. Participating countries: Egypt, Algeria, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the Faroe Islands. Effective 1 January 2012, the countries of the Western Balkans were also admitted to the Euro-med cumulative zone: Albania, Croatia, Macedonia and Serbia. Cumulative with the EU is not yet possible and does not apply to agricultural products mentioned in Chapters 1 to 24. Pan-European accumulation: with primary materials from EFTA, the EU or Turkey. Full accumulation: the appropriate treatment must not take place on the customs territory of a single country, but can be carried out throughout the territory of a free trade agreement. Full accumulation is only provided for under the AELE-Tunisia free trade agreement. The ongoing implementation of these agreements obliges Switzerland to adopt relevant EU legislation in the covered sectors. Most (but not all) Swiss free trade agreements contain such a rule. This means that the determination of the country of origin of primary materials from a third country is not taken into account, provided that their value does not exceed 10% of the factory starting price. However, if a percentage rule is established in the list, it cannot be exceeded by the application of the general value tolerance.

This is why this tolerance is particularly important for products for which the list provides for a jump in position. The general value tolerance cannot apply to products listed in Chapters 50 to 63 of the harmonized system, nor does it apply to products that have received only minimal processing in Switzerland. Switzerland`s trade policy refers to Switzerland`s approach to importing and exporting with other countries. If you expect goods to be in transit when EU-Swiss trade agreements are no longer in force, you can obtain a retrospective certificate of origin. This shows that the products are from the UK and can benefit from preferential conditions when your products arrive within 12 months or within 12 months of the date of the UK-Switzerland trade agreements. The signatories to a free trade agreement form a free trade area (for example. B Switzerland-EU).